Unlearning the human nature – a Sales & Marketing conundrum

If you are a salesperson, skip this paragraph and go to the next. If you are a marketer, continue reading. Raise your hand if at least once in your work you came across a sales team complaining to you “Our competition has this new product X, why aren’t we making it?” or “So-and-so brand just launched this new marketing campaign, why aren’t we doing something similar?”. Looks like everyone’s hand is up in the air. Rest of this post is all about this real-life sales vs. marketing conundrum. And by the way, dear salesperson, I know you continued to read this paragraph despite my asking you to skip to the next. It was a test to make you understand the fundamental human nature – the insatiable desire to get what you don’t have, especially when you are told someone else will have it.

We humans evolved with desire. “This is the monstrosity in love, lady,” Troilus tells Cressida in arguably Shakespeare’s most vexing and ambiguous play, “that the will is infinite and the execution confined, that the desire is boundless and the act a slave to limit.” Human desire, in other words, is infinite – we are perpetually unsatisfied even when we get what we want, and we are capable of wanting anything at all. And when we get what we want, we usually start to wish for what the neighbor has.

Good sales people are generally relentless and aggressive in nature. They want to sell the best products and services (who doesn’t?) and that’s when marketers and product managers get thrown the question “why aren’t we making the so-and-so product, when our competitors have it?”. Reasoning about tight budgets and resource constraints and technology challenges and vendor issues won’t work in this context.

In my 15 years of international experience, I’ve come across salespersons who are blatantly ignorant of their company’s products and services – people who cannot even articulate the real differentiators of their own products – but are well versed and thoroughly knowledgeable about their competitor’s products. Why? Because of the fundamental human nature to desire and want what they don’t have. Remember how kids crave for a certain toy, and once dad brings it for them, they play with it for a while, toss it aside and start wishing for their next toy. Very often I see the same tendencies in sales people. Needless to say, this is not good for the organization as a lot of energy and creativity is being wasted on wishing and wanting what they don’t have yet.

When Airbus launched the A380 super jumbo, the Boeing sales force must have rained over their product team asking for a matching response. Instead of wavering from their course, Boeing stuck to their core message of fuel efficiency and eco initiatives, and developed the 787 Dreamliner which has eventually taken to skies earlier this month. At the same time they also worked on a new version of their own jumbo jet, the 747-8, which is slated to fly by year’s end. Industry analysts have obviously shared varying opinions about Boeing’s approach, their production delays etc. But I do see them as a great example in the context of this post, as they stuck to their strategy rather than jump all over the place. Agree, this may not be applicable to your industry as the capital investment profiles, production costs and timelines are very different (prohibitive) for an aircraft manufacturer to change course every now and then. So treat this as an example to drive home my point.

Enough of understanding the problem, you will now be asking “is there a way out of this?” Absolutely yes. But it demands both marketers and sales leaders stepping up and acting as a team. Here are some practical tips that can help your organization get out of this perpetual cycle.

  • Come together as a team and think about selectively unlearning the human nature of desire. Observe the usage of the word “selective”. Be aware that it is desire that drives the sales force to perform and outperform. So don’t spill water over the fire and make them lose their passion to sell and achieve. Instead, brainstorm together on ‘how can we sell what we have, instead of crying out loud for what we don’t have’.
  • Sales leaders could coach their field sales force to channel their resources and energy and emotions to selling “the bird in hand”, instead of fighting in vain for “two in the bush”. They must handle it sensibly and sensitively as some sales people may get de-motivated when they see their manager “take sides with marketing” (this is particularly true in Asian context).
  • Product managers could take the opportunity to clearly articulate the company’s product strategy. Explain in simple one-two-three steps, why they chose to make product A and not product B, unlike competitors.
  • Marketers could build sales force training materials that can be used for educating the team as well as for external client presentations. Re-deploy existing marketing collaterals to reinforce the main messages and themes, so the sales force is well trained on their product benefits and differentiators.
  • Leaders could encourage sales force to go for a solution-sell approach instead. If backed by deep customer understanding, a total solution offer would appeal more to the customer than a stand-alone product, thus eliminating product-to-product comparisons, sanity check of features and technical specs etc.
  • At the same time collectively investigate any possible quick product wins, so long as it doesn’t jeopardize the company’s product strategy or trigger a financial debacle.

Yes, it is human nature to desire… but channel your desire in the right direction and you could be the next sales superstar.

Advertisements

One thought on “Unlearning the human nature – a Sales & Marketing conundrum

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s